Little C: Big Questions

What’s brilliant about the story “Little C” is its amazing ability to raise several ethical questions. For a story featuring a science fiction element involving genetics (which on its own should raise a few questions), that’s a pretty spectacular feat. The most basic ethical question that most stories raise, I believe, is “Is this science-fictiony thing good or bad?”

Let’s begin by breaking down the troubling ethical aspects of Little C.

What is the science fictiony thing?

Answer: Cloning

Basic Ethical Question. “Is this science-fictiony thing good or bad?

Answer: Well, it certainly seems to have disturbing uses.

The basic story is that the main character raises (from birth to adulthood) a clone of her late lover. While raising him as her own son, she raises him to be a replicate of her late lover, that is, she raises him to be her lover. Now this is where most of the troubling ethical issues arise.

Is wanting to replicate someone a good or bad thing?

Is expecting that clone to be just like it’s replicate a good  or bad thing?

(Which is a more particular way of asking, “Are clones exactly the same as their cloned counterparts?”)

IS WANTING TO BE SEXUALLY INVOLVED WITH SOMEONE YOU RAISED AS YOUR SON A GOOD OR BAD THING?

Here’s my opinion because that’s all I can offer.

Is wanting to replicate someone a good or bad thing?

It’s understandable. Loss is a powerful thing. I’ve read many stories involving themes of “bring back the dead” or “raising the dead.” There certainly seems to be a motif in many stories about “speaking with the dead.” Favorite example: Pet Semetary by Stephen King (the movie not the book, surprisingly)

Is expecting that clone to be just like it’s replicate a good thing?

Expecting similarities isn’t necessarily an ignorant position. When we have children, often times they have many physical characteristics of their parents–including NATURAL athletic ability. However, I think in the nature vs. nurture argument, nurture has a much more prominent role in who become. If our parents raise us to be assholes, we’re certainly more inclined to be assholes. Perhaps, some of us a higher propensity for certain behaviors (short temper for example) but seeing how our parents react to situations in our development stages should have a greater affect.

IS WANTING TO BE SEXUALLY INVOLVED WITH SOMEONE YOU RAISED AS YOUR SON A GOOD OR BAD THING?

Since SOCIETY has made any concept of incest, even non-blood-related incest, such a taboo in my eyes, I’d have to say it’s a bad thing. <<This is my ultimate point, that we’re all judging this element of the story negatively because of its place as a socially taboo activity. Should it eventually become socially acceptable? Again, my preconceived notions of “incest being eternally bad” prohibit from answering this question fairly or objectively.

Leviathan

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~ by leviathan on February 10, 2012.

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